Jeremiah 26

Before Reading.

  • Centering prayer— Pray for illumination, “Lord, open my heart and mind by the power of the Holy Spirit,” and remain in silence.

Reading.

  • Read slowly, keeping any words or phrase that come to your mind, and mark on them.
  • Close eyes and meditate on what you read.
  • Take a note if you have question, inspiration.   

Read Jeremiah 26

Jeremiah’s prophecies in the Temple.  

Overview.

The first half of chapters of the book of Jeremiah (1-25) are prophecy of theodicy, defending God’s justice against the sins and wickedness of Judah, people, and other nations. In his prophecy, Jeremiah bears the divine character in himself, portraying of God in such ways— multi-faceted, evoking emotions of God’s love and wrath, weeping God over the fate of the city.

The second half of chapters (26-52) are prophecy of restoration, representing God who builds, plants, restores, and forgives. Especially chapters 30-33 are called “little book of consolation,” in which God calls the people home and promises them new life and a restored Jerusalem.

Chapter 26 is Jeremiah’s second temple sermon delivered perhaps during the Feast of Booths (September – October) in 609 BC. This sermon focuses on Judah’s reaction to Jeremiah’s prophecy regarding the fate of the temple and city.

Jeremiah defends his prophecy that he is speaking as true prophets of God (v.12), calling for repentance of the people, and that he is willing to die at the hands of his accusers.

The leadership of Judah responds to his sermon differently. Some accuse him of prophesying falsely and seek to put him to death, and they arrest Jeremiah. Some defend him reminding of their past story of Micah and Uriah. In the end, Jeremiah is rescued from the hand of the people who wants to put him to death.

Reflection.

 1. What does this passage tell you about God?

 2. What does this passage tell you about people.?

3. What does this passage tell you about yourself and God’s will for you?  

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