Ezekiel 34

Before Reading.

  • Centering prayer— Pray for illumination, “Lord, open my heart and mind by the power of the Holy Spirit,” and remain in silence.

Reading.

  • Read slowly, keeping any words or phrase that come to your mind, and mark on them.
  • Close eyes and meditate on what you read.
  • Take a note if you have question, inspiration.   

Read Ezekiel 34

Overview.

Shepherds and sheep.

In speaking of Israel’s restoration, Ezekiel begins with the problem of Israel’s leadership. Through the image of a shepherd and his sheep, Ezekiel prophesized to reassert divine kingship over Israel.

“Woe to the shepherds of Israel,” (v.2) indicate the kings of Israel who misused their people and scattered them. This oracle applies the doctrine of individual responsibility (Ezekiel 18:5-32) to the rulers of Israel, who are also subject to God’s law and judgement.

“Wild animals” (v.5) indicates the attackers of Judah and Israel, especially Assyria and Babylonia.

“I I myself will search for my sheep and look after them,”(v.11) is the vision of divine kingship. God is the good shepherd who will gather the dispersed and injured flock, and who will separate sheep, good and bad. And God will place his servant David to tender God’s flock. This is Ezekiel’s prophetic vision of the coming of Messiah, whom later came true in Jesus Christ. Jesus revealed himself as the Good Shepherd. (John 10:14).

The restoration of the relationship between the Good Shepherd (God) and flock (Israel) is asserted by God’s covenantal solidarity. “You are my sheep, the sheep of my pasture, are people, and I am your God, declares the Sovereign Lord.” (v.31)

1. What does this passage tell you about God?

2. What does this passage tell you about people.?

3. What does this passage tell you about yourself and God’s will for you?  

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